+1 805-541-1003

Can't access Vimeo or YouTube to watch these videos at work? Download directly from landfx.com.

Efficient Irrigation for Small Spaces

Video Length:  1:08:58
Presented By:  Chris Roesink
Friday, 31 October 2014
Rate this item
(0 votes)
 
Irrigation design is already complex enough without the added challenges of small spaces. Join us this Friday as Chris takes you through the challenges of and solutions to irrigating in restricted areas.
 
 

Download the presentation PDF >>

 

Webinar Content:

(Note: The following catalog of content covered in this webinar is time stamped to allow you to follow along or skip to sections of the video that are relevant to your questions, You can also search for content on this page using the FIND command in your browser (CTRL + F in Windows, Command + F in Mac OS.)

Small Space Scenarios (2:30)

  • Shrub beds
  • Gardens
  • Hedge rows
  • Pots
  • Parking Medians
  • Parkways
  • Street trees
  • Small turf areas
  • Raised planters
  • Green roofs
  • Green walls

 

Likely Locations (3:05)

  • Small residential spaces
  • HOQ common areas
  • Shopping centers
  • Schools
  • Commercial space
  • Street medians

 

Small Space Irrigation Challenges (3:40)

  • Preventing overspray
  • Preventing runoff due to high application rates
  • Preventing water damage to adjacent property
  • Short radius usually = high application (precipitation) rates
  • Curves and irregularly shaped edges
  • Heat island effect from hardscape and utilities
  • Drainage issues
  • Lots of equipment in small spaces
  • Heavy foot traffic
  • Scheduling challenges
    • Sun exposure
    • Reflective light
    • Mixed application rates
    • Mixed plant type

 

Design Considerations (5:20)

  • Local watering ordinances
  • Hydro-zones
  • Zone budgeting
  • Plant water relationship
  • Soil type (water holding capacity)
  • Water source
  • Dynamic system pressure
  • Filter and pressure regulation
  • “Defensible Design”
  • Mature plant size
  • Overhead vs. drip
  • In-line emitter tubing vs. point source emitters
  • On-grade vs. subsurface emitters
  • Important to have clear written notes and details for depth of installation
  • Contractors need specifics to bid project accurately

 

Small Space Challenges

  • Tight spaces
  • Small spaces in high-traffic areas
  • Irrigation potted plants
  • Small spaces, tall grasses
  • Raised planters
  • Small spaces with mixed sun exposure

 

Determining Sun Exposure and Shadows (11:50)

  • Anticipate shadows next to structures
  • Biggest maintenance challenge
  • Look for reflective surfaces such as windows
  • North vs. southwest facing
  • Break up area irrigated into smaller hydro-zones to avoid over / underwatering

 

Designing Around Utilities and Heat Islands (12:34)

 

More Utilities Than Soil (13:04)

 

Maintaining Optimal Plant Health (13:40)

 

Small-Space Solutions to Consider (14:22)

  • Short-radius sprays
  • MP800SR
  • Bubblers
  • Micro sprays
  • Deep root watering systems
  • Drip “Micro Irrigation”
  • In-line emitter tubing
  • Point source emitters
  • Subsurface solutions

 

Overhead Solutions (15:45)

  • Overspray is no longer socially acceptable
  • Attention to detail with head layout

 

Sprays for small spaces (17:05)

  • Lower efficiency
  • 1/8” – 7” per hour
  • Average soil intake rate: .25 – .75 per hour
  • 30-PSI regulation recommended
  • 2’ – 6’ radius
  • Dedicated zone recommended
  • High traffic areas
  • Susceptible to clogging
  • Cycle and soak recommended

 

Short-radius spray nozzles (17:58)

  • MP 800SR (Short Radius) (18:10)
  • MP Side Strip (20:00)
  • MP Side Strips vs. Conventional Strip Sprays (20:30)
  • Pro Spray PRS40 (20:56)
  • MP 800SR Optimal Performance (21:15)

 

Bubbler Systems (21:39)

  • PCB Bubblers (21:52)
  • MSBN Nozzles (22:20)
  • Hunter Pop-Up Bubbler Nozzles (22:50)
  • MSBN/PCBN Retractable Bubbler Nozzles (23:07)
  • MSBN Nozzles on Popups (23:30)
  • Center Strip Bubbler Nozzles (23:54)
  • Multi-Stream Micro Irrigation (24:32)
  • Micro Sprays (25:07)

 

Question: Can you recommend a valve for irrigation in small spaces? (25:36)

Answer: Definitely a low-flow valve. See slides at 29:17 in this presentation.

 

Root Zone Watering (26:56)

Deep Root Watering Systems (26:56)

  • Designed for trees and large shrubs
  • Allows water, oxygen, and nutrients to entire rootball
  • Installs flush with grade
  • Ideal for areas with hardscape:
    • Parking islands
    • Median strips
    • Small planters
    • Narrow row plantings

 

Root Zone Watering System (RZWS) (27:37)

 

Low-Flow Valves Required for Smaller Systems (29:17)

 

Filtration Kits (30:00)

 

Point Source Emitters (30:30)

  • Ideal for sparse plantings
  • Pressure-compensating
  • Consistent flow front to back of line
  • Fairly inexpensive
  • Diaphragm
  • Coined edge for easier handling

 

Self-Piercing Barb & Threaded Models (32:36)

 

½” Female Thread (12mm) (33:10)

 

Micro Products Made in the USA (33:45)

 

 

On-Grade Drip (34:07)

Drip (Micro) Irrigation Terms and Concepts (35:09)

  • Application rate
  • Self-flushing
  • Root intrusion/ Physical root barrier
  • Pressure compensation
  • Check valve / non-drain anti-siphon

 

Emitter Line – Standard (37:06)

 

Hunter Professional Landscape Dripline (PLD) (37:31)

  • Ideal for Densely Planted Spaces
  • Fits great in tight spaces
  • Ideal for hedge rows

 

PLD On-Grade Installation (38:21)

 

Spray Retrofit Applications (38:53)

 

Snake Layout (39:14)

 

Standard On-Grade Drip (40:08)

Benefits:

  • Easy to install
  • Inexpensive to install
  • Easy to repair
  • See it running / inspection

 

Issues:

  • Coverage/water movement
  • Vandalism
  • Sustainability
  • Appearance
  • Not as effective for subsurface applications

 

Subsurface Irrigation Products: Eco-Mat and PLD-ESD (41:32)

Traditional Inline Drip Adapted to a Subsurface Application (42:38)

 

Traditional Inline Drip Wetting Pattern (42:33)

 

Problem: Horizontal Water Movement By Soils (Sandy soil vs. clayey soil) (44:10)

  • Sandy soil: use 12” spacing
  • Clayey soil: use 18” to 24” spacing

 

Two Subsurface Product Offerings: Eco-Mat and PLD-ESD (Enhanced Subsurface Drip) (45:13)

  • Eco–Mat Layout Technique (45:45)
  • Ideal installation is just below the optimal root depth. (46:43)

 

Project Examples Using Fleece Technology (Eco-Mat) (47:04)

 

Subsurface Irrigation Challenges (52:00)

  • Additional labor and material cost to project
  • Relatively new concept domestically
  • Managing soil moisture
  • Soil moisture sensors recommended
  • Fertigation system recommended
  • Temporary overhead irrigation may be required for establishment
  • Advise maintenance staff of install depth

 

Example of Temporary Overhead Irrigation (53:06)

 

Vegetation Benefits of Subsurface Drip Irrigation (53:38)

  • Water supplied directly at the roots means healthier roots.
    • Study shows 2” longer average root growth
  • Possible supplementation with fertilizer injection systems
  • Increased water storage capacity of soil
  • Reduction of soil erosion and improved plant health
  • Enhanced soil capillary action

 

PLD-ESD (54:08)

PLD-ESD Installation Examples (54:20)

 

Ideal Placements for PLD-ESD (55:00)

 

Green Roofs (57:00)

Green Roof Benefits (57:00)

  • Insulation
    • Energy savings from heating/cooling
  • Heat mitigation
    • Urban “heat island” effect
      • Green roof: 36 degrees Celsius
      • Traditional roof: 70 degrees Celsius
  • Stormwater runoff
    • Quality and Quantity
  • Increased usable space
  • Visual appeal

 

Green Roof Basics (57:20)

 

Hunter’s Green Roof and Wall Product Support (57:54)

 

Green Roof Resources (58:38)

 

Green Roof Support (58:52)

 

Hunter Drip Design Guides (available at HunterIndustries.com) (59:22)

 

Additional References (59:45)

 

Q & A Section on Eco-Mat (1:00:20)

Recommendations:

  • Don’t drive on any turf
  • Recommended depth: 6”
  • Lifespan: 25 years
  • Roots can grow through Eco-Mat without creating problems

 

Question: Does Hunter offer a multi-port drip emitter?

Answer: As of 2014, no. However, they’re currently expanding their drip product line and may very well offer one in the future.